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chiefs. kennedy stood up to those people. >> in 2009, obama had the contrary result with the generals pressing him on afghanistan, the surge there. >> do you think -- i want to hear you talk about it -- has foreign policy in a grand sense changed at all since the colored war? it's been over for more than 20 years now. and is the u.s. still seeing the world as its oyster to be cracked open, so to speak? >> you're answering your own question. >> would assume, the 9/11, the u.s. -- >> i'm not a historia. i came from this from ooutside. was as season of peace in the late 80s with reagan and gorbachev reach something agreement ops nuclear arms. and then when bush comes into office in january of '89, of course, dukakis was my choice, and he was leading in the race, but bush comes in, has a golden opportunity. this is a truman-stalin moment. this is -- of course gorbachev is offering him an oyster, going to take all the soviet troupes out of eastern europe. going to let nato take over germany. unite germany and nato can have their germany as long as nato doesn't go further. these kinds of th
at the annual national press club authors night and joining us now is author r. renshaw agree who has written a book called first cameraman. what is with the obama administration. >> is a videographer, sent in a carriage for a few years in the white house. the lifecycle did not work on the campaign formally or the white house power to the new and strange world of super pacs and independent expenditures. spectaculars about the campaign into destiny. as you get hooked up in a president? >> it is the right place, right time. a friend of mine was working at cnn as a documentary producer and has a more normal path into politics. i was not the first on anyone's list. she would knew i wanted to get involved in broadband and then i just hit it off with the senator and started traveling inside the bubble. >> how long did you do it? was a 24/7 for a while? >> you know, especially on the campaign, it really felt like 20 for seven. i was practically living in chicago when i was there too were three days a month. but scaled back a little bit at the white house because the president is someone who values t
on a question raised earlier. what has been the first response to this book better in press accounts her position on the writing of this book which has been a very public thing. "the new york times" has stood behind and jodi cantor has been part of a moment of exploring michelle obama. so it's not as if she doesn't know. press accounts suggest that she has not fully embraced this investigation. and so i wonder now that the books out the story send critics of reagan you're at the schaumburg center research in black culture, has she called you a? have you received an e-mail? [laughter] >> i can tell you that the first lady to send off and call or e-mail reporters. that i know for sure. she is a policy of not participating in books and that is a blanket policy, which is sad for all of us who are writing them. during the process i met with members of her staff to kind of update them as i went along. before the book came out i gave copies to her staff and she has also seen the books. what she thinks i don't know. >> well c
at the annual national press club author's night and joining us now is author aran chatri. he has written a book called first cameraman. what is your association with the obama campaign and president obama? >> i was his first videographer which is something i carried through the first 2 1/2 years of the white house. this last cycle did not work on campaign formally or the white house. i worked in the world of murky world of super pacs and pacs and expenditures. >> talk to us about the campaign in 2008? how did you get hooked up with the president? >> there was ad in craig's list. that is not the case. right place and right time. a friend of mind was working at cnn as documentary producer. that is more normal task in politics. as much as i was interested i was fiction filmmaker, not really first on anyone's list. she knew i was passionate about politics and wanted to get involved and hit it off with the senator and traveling inside the bubble. >> how long did you do it? was it 24/7 for you for a while? >> you know, especially on the campaign it really felt like 24/7. i was practically living in c
. the local authorities came up and wanted to know whether we wanted to press charges. we said no, we believe in peace and love and nonviolence. it was may 9, 1961. in february of 09, less than a month after president iraq obama had been inaugurated as president, one of the young men that had attacked us came to my congressional office on capitol hill and said mr. lewis, i'm one of the people of the e.u. will you forgive me? i want to apologize. his son had been encouraging his father to go out and seek other of. i said yes, i accept your apology. i forgive you. his son started crying, he started crying, i started crying. he gave me a hug, i hate that. then i seen this gentleman three other times. he called a brother and i called them better. that's what the movement was all about, to be reconciled. [applause] this book is about reconciliation. it is a fine analysis that we are one people, one family, one house, that we must be reckoned as, that those of us who live here in america, those of us who live on this piece of real estate must learn to live together as brothers and sisters we would
. a local authorities came up and wanted to know whether we wanted to press charges. we said no, we believe in peace and love and nonviolence. that was may 9, 1961. in february on nine, less than a month after president barack obama had been inoculated as president, one of the young men that had attacked us came to my congressional office on capitol hill and said mr. lewis, i'm one of the people that beat you, will you forgive me? i want to apologize. he had been encouraging his father to go and seek out people he had attacked. i said yes, i accept your apology. i forgive you. his son started crying, he started crying, i started crying. he gave me a hug. i hugged him back. since then i've seen this documentary of their times. he calls a brother and i call him brother. that's what the movement was all about. but this book is about reconciliation. it is one people, one family, one house, that we must be reconciled, that those of us who live in america, those of us who live on this piece of real estate must learn to live together as brothers and sisters as stuck to king suggested. the late ran
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6